Personally speaking

language: a feminist guide

Earlier this month, when Andrea Wulf won the Royal Society’s 2016 Science Book prize for The Invention ofNature, a biography of the scientist Alexander von Humboldt, the Guardian’s John Dugdale wrote a piece headed ‘Why have women finally started winning science book prizes?’  Um, is it because they’re writing more science books than they used to? Is it because the book prize judges are finally recognising their talents? No: apparently women are being rewarded for making science personal. ‘Female science writers’, says Dugdale,

are more likely to focus on people, while their male counterparts are more likely to address a problem, a mystery or an underexplored scientific field.

So: men do the difficult, sciencey stuff, while women concentrate on the human angle. It’s yet another iteration of that ancient cliché, ‘men are interested in ideas and women are interested in people’.

Apart from being sexist…

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Wearing the most comfortable sandals ever – more stereotypes about men and women — Transgender Reality

Trans people online are quick to assure us that being transgender has nothing to do with stereotypes, with clothes or hairstyles. So being transgender is not anything to do with stereotypes about clothes and hairstyles, and nobody thinks they are transgender or transition because of hairstyles and clothes. Except for when putting on a dress and […]

via Wearing the most comfortable sandals ever – more stereotypes about men and women — Transgender Reality

Gender-affirmative therapist: Baby who hates barrettes = trans boy; questioning sterilization of 11-year olds same as denying cancer treatment

4thWaveNow

Note: 4thWaveNow frequently features posts (like this one) that focus, often unflatteringly, on the activists and providers involved in pediatric transition. These people aren’t ogres who intend to bring harm to the young people and families under their care and influence. They undoubtedly sincerely believe they are doing the right thing. The purpose here, as ever, is not to demonize, but to shed light on the potential and actual damage done by the practice and ideology of “gender affirmation.”  Harms done not only to children and their families, but to the decades of progress achieved by the women’s and LGB liberation movements.


A well known subscriber to the “gender affirmative” approach to trans-identified children is Diane Ehrensaft, PhD., a clinical and developmental psychologist. Dr. Ehrensaft, author of The Gender Creative Child, plays a powerful role in the burgeoning field of pediatric transgenderism. She is director and chief psychologist for the University…

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Gender-affirmative therapist: Baby who hates barrettes = trans boy; questioning sterilization of 11-year olds same as denying cancer treatment — 4thWaveNow

Note: 4thWaveNow frequently features posts (like this one) that focus, often unflatteringly, on the activists and providers involved in pediatric transition. These people aren’t ogres who intend to bring harm to the young people and their families under their care and influence. They undoubtedly sincerely believe they are doing the right thing. The purpose here, as […]

via Gender-affirmative therapist: Baby who hates barrettes = trans boy; questioning sterilization of 11-year olds same as denying cancer treatment — 4thWaveNow

A Civil Gender Critical Discussion?

Dead Wild Roses

debate    The following is an exchange on tumblr between littlepumkinprincess and auntiewanda.  I have changed the formatting a bit for the sake of readability, but their words and ideas remain the same.  Many of the arguments that occur between gender critical feminists and trans-advocates play out in this exchange.  It is certainly not an exhaustive collection of all the point/counter-points that exist but rather it illustrates a cross-section of what many interactions happen to look like.  

Discussions of this nature tend to be controversial, so a reminder here to please be civil and respectful in the comment section.

    

  “I’m not advocating violence against TERF’s but I am saying y’all need to stop playing the victim when you’re named that because you treat transgender people like shit, you don’t need special treatment because people called you out on that.”

  The criteria for “treating like shit” seems…

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With Insurers on Board, More Hospitals Offer Transgender Surgery

This is why transgender conferences are often so highly sponsored by companies and business associations, in contrast to the work of anti-gender feminists. It is especially excellent for the careers and finances of surgeons. See this STC category for more articles on this.

 

At the Wall Street Journal, Sumathi Reddy writes:

Surgery is becoming more available for transgender people as a growing number of academic centers and hospitals offer the procedure and insurance companies provide coverage.

Stacey Parsons, a 45-year-old from Kent, Ohio, had genital surgery in August at Cleveland Clinic, which last year launched a transgender-surgery-and-medicine program. For years the procedure was unattainable for Ms. Parsons because it costs upward of $20,000 and was rarely covered by insurance.

Other medical centers also have begun offering transgender surgeries, including Boston Medical Center, Oregon Health & Science University in Portland and Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins Hospital, which had one of the first such centers in the 1960s, is in the process of re-establishing a transgender program and will begin accepting patients by early next year. Previously, patients wanting transgender surgeries had to seek them out through private-practice plastic surgeons or in countries such as Thailand.

Demand is high, say doctors. Boston Medical Center, which opened its Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery this year, began performing vaginoplasty, which creates a vagina, earlier in September. It currently has 200 people on a waiting list for the procedure, says Joshua Safer, the transgender center’s director.

“There’s much greater buy-in [for transgender surgeries] in the conventional medical community than there ever was before,” says Dr. Safer.

In 2014, the U.S. government’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began to allow coverage of transgender-related surgery. Currently, Medicaid programs in 12 states and the District of Columbia cover transition-related care, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality, in Washington, D.C. Many commercial insurers also have begun covering such procedures.

Stacey Parsons shown at Cleveland Clinic, where she underwent transgender surgery in August.Stacey Parsons shown at Cleveland Clinic, where she underwent transgender surgery in August. PHOTO: DUSTIN FRANZ FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

 

Research on the surgeries is mixed. Critics point to a 2011 study published in the online journal PLOS One by researchers at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden that followed more than 300 transgender people after surgery and found they had a higher rate of psychiatric care, suicide and mortality than a control group. But a number of other studies have shown that transgender people undergoing various surgeries report greater quality of life and satisfaction years later. Doctors say with more academic institutions tracking the procedures, higher quality studies in the future should produce more evidence-based outcomes.

Ms. Parsons grew up as Scott Orms. “I never really knew that I was transgender as a child,” she says. “The words weren’t there.” She self-identified as gay when she was younger, but still didn’t feel like she fit in. When she saw the process of transitioning to a woman documented on television in 2004, she realized it was a possibility. “My whole outlook on life changed,” she says.

She then came out as Stacey. “My former employer did not make it an easy journey for me,” requiring her to use the men’s bathroom, for example. Ms. Parsons, a former factory worker, stopped working in 2008 because of a heart condition.

Stacey Parsons holds a photo of herself from 2003, when she was Scott Orms, over a decade before she began hormone therapy. Stacey Parsons holds a photo of herself from 2003, when she was Scott Orms, over a decade before she began hormone therapy. PHOTO:DUSTIN FRANZ FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

She started therapy, joined a support group and began hormone-therapy treatments. In 2008, she had an orchiectomy, or removal of the testicles. A year later she had breast-augmentation surgery, but a vaginoplasty was out of reach financially. She was dating a man, Mike Parsons, whom she eventually married in 2012.

In December, Ms. Parsons and her husband met with Cecile Unger,the director of Cleveland Clinic’s transgender-surgery-and-medicine program, which performed its first vaginoplasty that month. Dr. Unger told Ms. Parsons she could help her get coverage through her insurance.

Centers performing vaginoplasty surgeries generally follow guidelines from the nonprofit World Professional Association for Transgender Health. The guidelines require that patients have letters from two medical professionals confirming a diagnosis of gender dysphoria, or feeling that patients’ identity is the opposite of their biological sex. They also must be on hormone therapy and living in their self-affirmed gender continuously for at least a year.

In a vaginoplasty, parts of the penis are used to create the vagina, clitoris and labia. Nerve endings are preserved to maintain sensation. The urethra is shortened to construct a female urethra.

“I want to make sure they are happy and comfortable living as themselves full-time before I commit to doing an irreversible surgery,” Dr. Unger says.

Vaginoplasty complications are rare but can include wound infection, excessive bleeding or injuries to the bladder or rectum. It takes about six to 12 weeks before the wound is healed and the reconstructed anatomy is functional, says Dr. Unger. Long-term healing can take up to a year.

Before Ms. Parsons had her surgery, Dr. Unger told her to lose weight for optimal results. The surgery took just over four hours. She was in the hospital for three nights and then transferred to a hotel for four nights.

Stacey Parsons says she finally feels at peace with herself after undergoing a surgery that she had wanted for more than a decade.

Nearly two months after her surgery, Ms. Parsons says she still has some discomfort but is pleased with the results. “I’m just at peace with myself now,” she says. “I didn’t even realize how much I still had an issue of how I was living in my body.”

Dr. Unger, who is 34, says she received training from a Philadelphia surgeon, who allowed her to assist in more than a dozen of the surgeries while she was completing a fellowship in pelvic reconstruction at Cleveland Clinic. She says she has performed vaginoplasty on five patients and is scheduling one to two surgeries a month. Her practice also includes doing reconstructions or revisions on patients who have had previous surgery. She and her team hope to begin offering transgender men phalloplasty surgeries, which create a penis and are a more complex and costly surgery.

A phalloplasty is usually performed in stages. First, the vagina is removed. The penis is constructed using tissue from another part of the body, such as the forearm or thigh. About a year later an implant may be inserted to allow for sexual functioning.

Jens Berli leads the plastic surgery component of the transgender health program at Oregon Health & Science University. He performs breast augmentation and facial feminization surgeries on transgender women. He and his team are scheduled to perform their first phalloplasty this week. A colleague, a urologist, began performing vaginoplasty surgeries there in May and currently has 180 patients on a waiting list, Dr. Berli says.

Phalloplasty surgeries are more complex than vaginoplasty and complications aren’t unusual. Most of the cost is increasingly covered by insurance and can range from $50,000 to $125,000, experts say.

One of the first fellowships in transgender surgeries will begin this fall at Weiss Memorial Hospital in Chicago, says Loren Schechter,medical director of the hospital’s Center for Gender Confirmation Surgery, who has been doing the surgeries for nearly 17 years.

“The patient population is very, very grateful. To change somebody’s life in a few hours is really rewarding,” says Rachel Bluebond-Langner, an assistant professor of surgery in the division of plastic surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She says she now works almost exclusively with transgender patients since insurers in the state began covering them over the past two years.

 

Tranz Trances, Session 3

Madam Nomad

11800264_1479268932388342_1932913393874812129_nI have been thinking about what it was that triggered me into writing about the Tranz issue. I had been going along with it, reserving judgment, not taking it personally, not seriously questioning it, never confronting anyone who believed that tranzing was not only possible, but somehow virtuous and brave. This morning it came to me exactly what it was that turned the tide for me and gave me the courage to begin questioning this phenomenon in public.

maxresdefaultAmy Beede was a woman in the psychiatric survivor community of Vermont, a “frequent flyer,” as they describe people who are in and out of psychiatric hospitals on a regular basis. The first time I met Amy was in 1985. We had the same counselor, who was working with us on emotional problems connected with being sexually assaulted by our fathers during our childhoods. I met Amy at the psych unit at Central…

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Transactivist strategic medical policy priorities for the 20-teens

GenderTrender

[image added by me- GM] [image added by me- GM]

By Dr. Kelly Winters, Ph.D., member of the International Advisory Panel for the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) Standards of Care:

WPATH: clarify and correct the childhood “desistance” myth statement in the SOC7

WPATH: Issue a public policy statement discrediting the practice of gender-conversion psychotherapies that is consistent with the SOC7

APA: clarify and correct the childhood “desistance” myth statement in the DSM-5

APA: remove “Transvestic Disorder” category from the DSM-5

WHO: initiate substantive conversation on converging the Adult/Adolescent Gender Incongruence categories in the proposed ICD-11 with the childhood category to refute the historical stereotype of childhood gender “confusion” and practice of gender conversion psychotherapies

US Dept. of HHS: align transition related categories in ICD-10-CM to ICD-11 in 2018

US Dept. of HHS/CMS: issue a National Coverage Determination for surgical transition care that is recognized as medically necessary by US and international medical authorities

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WAR OF THE WORLDS: GENDER ANGELS GO AGAINST GENDER GHOSTS

GenderTrender

ehrensaft-gender-angels-1ehrensaft-gender-angels-2ehrensaft-3ehrensaft-4ehrensaft-5ehrensaft-6

Slides are from : ‘A Developmental Perspective Of Transgender & Gender-Nonconforming Youth And A Collaborative Model Of Care’ presented by Diane Ehrensaft, Ph.D. at the 2016 Nadherny/Calciano Memorial Youth Symposium: ‘Clinical Essentials for Increased Understanding of the Transgender Community’.

PDF here: http://news.casaofsantacruz.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Calciano-Developmental-Pespective.pdf

Video here. Ehrensaft presentation begins at 1 hour:

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